university presses

Guest post: Academic publishing is not in crisis—it’s still just changing

I’m pleased to host the blog’s first guest post, by John Hussey, senior key accounts sales manager at Ingram Content Group, a leading book distributor. Here’s John: In 2014, I penned an article for Against the Grain titled “Academic Publishing Is Not in Crisis—It’s Just Changing” in which I described the transformation of university press publishing… Continue reading Guest post: Academic publishing is not in crisis—it’s still just changing

university presses

Emplotting the recent history of university press publishing

Here are some of my favorite statistics about university press publishing: One university press has closed since 2010. 83% of scholarly monographs find a publisher. 70–80% of faculty prefer print for book-length reading. 20–25% of university press sales are to libraries (down from approximately 70% in the 1970s). At the University of California, 7% of… Continue reading Emplotting the recent history of university press publishing

university presses

The state of university press publishing (questions from the Chronicle Review)

The Chronicle Review asked members of the university press community to respond to a set of questions about the state of the field; it’s a good piece and I encourage you to read it. I was flattered to have some of my responses quoted in the article and have, with permission, posted my full answers below. 1.            What… Continue reading The state of university press publishing (questions from the Chronicle Review)

university presses

Why does Inside Higher Ed think it’s okay to misrepresent the state of university press publishing?

In articles this month about a Mellon-funded report on humanities publishing and the threatened closure of Duquesne University Press, Inside Higher Ed made factually incorrect statements about the state of university press publishing. “Many presses have closed or scaled back their operations in recent years,” they wrote on February 20, even though only five of 140… Continue reading Why does Inside Higher Ed think it’s okay to misrepresent the state of university press publishing?

digital humanities · publishing · university presses

Ways to talk about innovation, and ways not to

There are, I think, two different ways to talk about innovation in scholarly publishing, and university press publishing especially. The first stresses what innovation can do. It’s gee whiz and emphasizes how scholarship can ping around in new ways, or become less linear, more interactive, and more collaborative. A lot of this comes from our… Continue reading Ways to talk about innovation, and ways not to